Sharing the Stage

For those who have experienced public speaking, have you ever shared the floor with a guest or a partner? This is nothing new to our world and you will always be asked to work with other people.

How do you know good or bad chemistry between co-hosts?

In my 4years as a professional host/emcee, I’ve had my share of the best, the worst, then there’ just the untrained. What I’ve realized is that not all people who can speak well are qualified to be a public speaker, moreover, they are not the best to co-host with.

Let me take you back a bit 4 years ago when I started on radio where I was trained by DJ Chloe (of Mellow 94.7) who I got to first partner with on hosting. Chloe was also the one who got me into radio and started me up with hosting and I cannot say it enough that I owe this career to her. Being a seasoned announcer, Dj Chloe is very well rounded. She is quick, witty, articulate and knows how to pace a sequence. She can balance her co-hosts energy with hers if her partner is low (which was usually my case when I open a program), she knows how to keep the energy up when it’s dragging, funny when it calls for and never leaves her partner hanging. I say this because I’ve experienced other co-hosts who can’t keep it tight and does their own thing.

A good partner always lets a co-host and audience in on what he/she’s onto. A good co-host is also conscious enough not to be dragged into anything and neutralizes any excessive emotional behavior on stage. To have good chemistry, one has to feel out the situation whether to lead or downplay. Some hosts that I’ve seen (not partnered with) sky rockets the energy up and if the partner can’t keep up, they’ll just keep going without any regard. What’s even worst is, when your co-host would disagree (indirectly) with you especially during an adlib, or bashes / insults the partner live. These should be managed tastefully and discussed offline. To make it work, partners should talk about what and what not to say. Ride with each other’s flow when you go off-script.

I have also been on stage with someone less experienced than me. My take is when I tend to overpower my co-host, I throw comments or open questions that will give him/her an opening to get him/her back on track. If your partner is keen, they’ll pick up from that and get with the flow.

Not looking like a team on stage is something you dont want people to see. Since all eyes and ears are on you, people will immediately notice that something is up. And for someone like me who is observant (so I can learn), I’ll sniff that one out in an instant.

My last partner on radio DJ Jaybee was a fun part of my life. We’d always laugh and have fun on air. What I say, she agrees to and vice versa, whatever we didn’t agree on, we took it tastefully and transform it in a smart banter. We give each other room to speak our mind and if one needs to stall (especially when we need to load a song on deck) we knew how to catch each other and pickup where we left off. It takes time to get to know your partner and maximize your similarities or work around the differences.

Chemistry sometimes come naturally, some take time, and some never happen. It is not something you can force. You may learn or develop the chemistry and it’s always a give and take situation.

So what are your other hosting issues? Let’s talk about it.

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