Big Crowd vs. Small Crowd

If you have worked with me before, you might have heard me say that I have tried to avoid wedding gigs because I (used to) dread them. The intimacy and close-personal relationship of the guests to each other challenges me and basically, I thought I just didn’t want to ruin a family occasion. Ones that are recorded on video, ones that you bring along your memory until you grow old….”that’s the host that screwed up my wedding” type of thing.

Lately, I seem to have grown passed that and if you’ve also read my other blog entries, I’m beginning to enjoy it. It just dawned on me that I was actually the one creating the moments. I AM THE MASTER OF CEREMONIES (pardon the shameless plugging). Regardless of how a bride and a wedding planner envisions the event, it is up to me how to make it better…or worse. The timing, the lines I say, that mostly are spontaneous, create these moments, and I just thank the Big Guy up there for giving me this talent (if any) to do somethingnreally special formother people.

Yesterday, March 14 2015, I celebrated with the Pizzaro family. It was yet a hurdle I haven’t passed through in my life. It wasn’t the usual wedding, or a corporate party. They were celebrating a surprise party for Jessie Pizzaro on his 60th.

Remember when I said how I used to dread intimate occasions? This is a very good example. It was a very tight crowd of 30 guests consisting of family and close friends. With that much people, messing up a portion or sequence is highly noticeable. In a crowd of a thousand, I can create an illusion that I am staring at each one of them and engaging everyone. With a smaller crowd, I had to try to satisfy each one (or so I thought I should). I’m quite critical on myself and my performance. I have a certain level of quality that I expect from my profession especially with myself. If I had 1000 guests, I want to make sure they listen. All the more pressure to keep the attention of 30 guests, like in statistics, the smaller the quantity, the higher ratio of proportion is expected. I am quite used to adlibs but people are different from each other and like/dislike different things.

So as I was hoping, guests could arrive before the surprise so I can whip up a pretty good spiel. I was also praying that the guests were game enough to participate. Both were tough on me. Though part of me was really expecting that older people won’t really be as game, I just really wanted everyone to have fun. So I did my usual adlib punchlines, people laughed. When I asked them to say something special for Jessie, our celebrant, they did, and it was quite touching because Jessie was a crowd favorite. A Pieces if you are familar with the traits are very loyal. They pick the right people to be with and make them feel as comfortable as much as they can. They take emotions of their friends as their own and empathize soemtimes way too much. This was what I noticed evryone was telling him as they greeted him a happy birthday. When I finally got to warm up, I forgot all my worries. Everything went well.

Then we played some games.

Just like children’s games, I wanted them to enjoy each others’ company. The things you don’t usually do, these same things that you spend with friends and let you go out of your comfort zones are experiences never forgotten. I knew most of them are shy, even with incentives but the power of love and fun can change things and I hope I was able create this memorable moment with them. This I believe is what party should be all about…not the bass.

I have overcome 2 things that day. 1. I won’t doubt myself of screwing up a momentous occasion. I realized that as long as I stick with my objective of bringing memorable moments to my client friends, there’s nothing more special I can offer..and 2. Smaller crowds should not scare me anymore for the same reason as #1. I passed that hurdle lighthearted. I am lucky to be in the presence of a family that truly cares for someone and that I think was the highlight of my day.

To Jessie, a happy 60th and I wish you good health and wonderful company. To the Pizzaro family, thank you for the wonderful experience and for welcoming me to this occasion.

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