5 TIPS FOR DRESSING UP YOUR DREAM-WEDDING PRACTICALLY

By Moxx de Vera

“Magical,” the only word that brides wish to happen on their special day, the day that they will be one with the love of their life. That one day where everyone’s attention is on them, beautiful and in white.

Photo grabbed from Dave Sandoval’s Facebook account. 
Styling by Dave Sandoval
Photo by NicePrint Photography

Are you reading this because you are already planning your dream wedding? If so, I’ll hand it to you nice and straight, you are getting married for the first time, everyone is. Unless this is your second wedding, I don’t suppose you’ll be putting too much thought and research about it because it rarely happens that a bride gets married twice with the same extravagance. So let me paint you a picture, but just before I do, I want you to know that I am writing from a man’s point of view and probably have a slightly different priority when it comes to wedding reception planning, nonetheless, I’ve seen a good spectrum of styling to the simplest of events to big and elegant ones, some have made it difficult to work with and others enhanced the overall effect positively, so for what it’s worth, I just really want to send you some things to consider.  

From a producer’s viewpoint,meaning, YOU, the bride, or anyone who is producing or funding an event just simply want to have your money’s worth. You want things in order, seamless and organized. Aside from trying to be the highlight of the event, you want your guests to enjoy and remember that day. There are hundreds of factors to a successful event but today, I want you to take notice on your layout and styling.

Event stylists are very talented. They wouldn’t be in the business if they weren’t. They have the capacity to turn their visions into reality by executing details you wouldn’t probably have even thought of. The likes of the best local talents such as Dave Sandoval, Michael Ruiz, Teddy Manuel, Ralph Copacio, Tei Endencia, and a whole lot more I haven’t personally met, or exchange words have blown me away with the level of fantasy-like masterpieces in events. I take photos of the event styling and post it on Instagram because it’s note-worthy. You get instant good impressions from an event with excellent styling. So, what makes it great?

1. Make it thematic.

Styled by Dave Sandoval

Events come in themes. If you want it to be appealing, you have to make it consistent with a concept. Go with something that is either up to trend or close to your personality, why? So you can feel comfortable. Imagine creating a sophisticated setup and you’re the simplest person everyone knows. It will feel like you don’t fit in your own event. For some other types of events, understand the objective and work from there. Pick the theme you want and make it consistent. Choose the least colors possible unless your theme is rainbow or psychedelic. Don’t combine elements from different themes JUST BECAUSE.

2. Go all-in.

Arthur Solinap & Rochelle Pangilinan’s wedding
(photo grabbed from web-search)

There’s no room for half-baked concepts in events. It’s either you make it simple or you go all-in. There’s nothing wrong with a simple set up. You’ll know when an event is trying hard to pull something off because of the consistency. You can make it simple through the elements, centerpieces and other table ornaments, draping, color-combination.For a wedding couple on a budget, be realistic with the design. Don’t ask for the moon when you can’t build a rocket ship. Event stylist will be very forward with what you can get with your budget. Don’t be an internet meme of budget vs.reality.

3. Consider venue conditions.

A big venue can accommodate massive styling, or you can concentrate a spot to focus your styling if the venue is too big. You can’t cramp a small venue with too much styling. I’ve seen wedding receptions sacrifice the space for styling where guests can’t stand up at the same time because the tables are too cramped because of other elements. It’s either you have chosen a small venue, or you have too much event elements, pick one that is of more priority.

Air flow and air conditioning is another thing to consider. For venues in cold climates like Tagaytay or Baguio where it’s usually open air or garden weddings, it’s easy to style with drapes and other elements but for enclosed areas where air conditioning is high, drapes will restrict air flow, combining it with the event lights will make the place warm once people start coming in. If the A/C system is just near head-level,then drapes and other hanging items will be good, but consider it if it’s really necessary.

Stages are also considerable fora couple of reasons, to centralize event viewing where things happen and of course to highlight your main objective. Be reasonable with your stage.Professionals would know how big or how high your stage should be depending on the number of guests you’ll have as well as other venue conditions. If you have a big crowd, consider having a higher stage or live feed with a big-enough screen for videos. Sometimes you might need an extra screen for the other half of your guests (again, depending on the size). Be mindful of where you put it as well.If the venue is rectangular, you might want to consider placing a stage in the middle wall of the venue rather than the end.

Columns in the venue are something you can’t change but be considerate as well of guests you will be placing near a column. Will they be able to see around it? Will they be able to participate? Consider monitors or speakers for them.

4. Table designs.

(photo grabbed from web-search)

Here is where it gets critical. Beautifying your event styling is a priority but be sure that it’s aesthetic as well. I’ve encountered a lot of events with tall table centerpieces where guests can’t even see the person across the table. Sure, it’s elegant but if you’re a guest seated all the way at the back and you really want to participate but can’t see a thing beyond those ginormous centerpieces, you’ll probably speak up. I personally have had a lot of trouble connecting to guests who can’t even see me when I’m hosting, all because the vases and candle holders were blocking the guests’ view of the stage or dance floor.

Crowded tables are also unappreciated. From a stylist’s point of view, their work speaks for them and they table design elements are justifiable, but up to what point is it really justifiable? As a guest, I would like to be able to sit on a table for 8-10 people and maybe still able to put a plate or two in front of my spot.Sometimes other dishes are placed on the table for sharing and this cramps up the space. If aesthetics is not your priority, then you may skip this but it’s just something else to consider.

5. Fabrication

Sometimes, a bride is totally hands-on with her vision for her wedding that she wants something in particular. Be aware that not all items may be provided by the stylist and sometimes they will have to purchase this. Depending on your agreement, you may take a “particular” home for yourself if you made this fabricated or the stylist may own it if they could reuse it. You are the boss but unless it’s totally necessary, then go for it.

In the end, your stylist will beat your will when you have the budget to work with. No supplier in the right mind will commit to something that can’t be done. If they do, these are the suppliers who’ll later on give you a headache in payments or execution, so never risk it. Choose the stylist that fit your budget and your vision. What clients have to understand is that we, your suppliers were chosen. Choose us not just because of the trend or the budget. We want to work with you too because we want you to have what you deserve, and you deserve our best work because that’s what we do. This article is not intended to discredit any event stylist, these are just my observations from my point of view. Feel free to disagree or add to my opinions.

A couple more tips to make the best out of your deals. “Set your expectations, early on.” Do tell your suppliers what you envision so they can discern what can be done or not. Don’task for things last minute especially if it’s a heavy task. We are prepared for back up plans but only with enough time and budget. Consider your suppliers as talented individuals, not your assistants for hire. We are here for you, and if you built a good relationship with us, we MIGHT even go the extra mile, so it’s up to you how you treat us.

For more tips and consultation, you may contact me on my website www.moxxthehost.com, email me at moxxthehost@gmail.com and my Facebook Page www.facebook.com/moxxdeverapro

If I asked you, have you read so much in a few hours, you’d probably just laugh at me because I know a lot of you are bookworms. If I asked you though, have you read so much in a few hours…aloud…in public…in front of high achieving doctors and distiguished individuals, would you have the same reaction? 

I am proud for accomplishing such given the night of March 11, 2015. 

On the date I mentioned, I was referred by a highschool batchmate / friend, Donna to be the host of their self-organized event. Health & Lifestyle (or (H&L) is the only magazine for doctors, and this day recognized extraordinary individuals, groups and organizations that advocate a healthy lifestyle – The Exemplar Awards 2015. 



It was a night of celebrating and recognizing outstanding achievers in their fields and advocacy in bringing information and education to the public on a better lifestyle. It was an honor to have been a part of it. 

Words may not be enough to explain or honor these idividuals (group and organizations)  on the work they do to help other people and the industry but I did so in introducing them. I literaly did. Normally, I’d be asked to adlib or get spontaneous but that night was information-filled, a bit too much of what I could probably handle. I was responsible for a script filled with important names and terminologies (some of which I couldn’t even pronounce) that I had to perform (not just read out) so we don’t bore the audience to death. Being an announcer (before) and an experienced voice-over talent, I used everything I’ve got. I had to stress out items, sound off intonation for lines and read out things with modulated voice, and did I mention I had to perform this and not just read out? 



I’m used to speaking with long durations in a program but reading off of a script was a challenge. It requires mental focus a good, consistent pace in breathing and a lot more of both. A program, as I’ve mentioned in my other blog posts is chaotic, especially if it involves impromptu guests and changes in lineup of the program. These elements were also present and made it more challenging. Something that I’m also used to, but combining all those were a level up for me…ACHIEVEMENT UNLOCKED! I was at some point losing some of the pronounciations of names, terms and words but stammering and coming back to your mistakes will just make me look unprofessional. Most of the time, with a program like this, guests attention are not 100% so I left the event seemingly unscathed. There may be other people who could’ve pulled it off better but for me, it was an experience I can definitely learn from. I’m just glad my experience as a host helped my composure, my mental awareness and endurance to get through it. These things help me become better, experiencing these give me an edge to those who get it easy. 

At the end of the night, I was met with smiles, a lot of handshakes and “good job” congratulations. It feels good that it was still appreciated and had good feedback. I rated my own performance about 70% that night but the reactions and feedback made me rethink. Screw that, I prefer the smiles and handshakes. It feels good to be appreciated. It motivates me to be at my best all the time.



Congratulations again to the FAME team and thank you for having me. I hope to work with guys again.

For those who have experienced public speaking, have you ever shared the floor with a guest or a partner? This is nothing new to our world and you will always be asked to work with other people.

How do you know good or bad chemistry between co-hosts?

In my 4years as a professional host/emcee, I’ve had my share of the best, the worst, then there’ just the untrained. What I’ve realized is that not all people who can speak well are qualified to be a public speaker, moreover, they are not the best to co-host with.

Let me take you back a bit 4 years ago when I started on radio where I was trained by DJ Chloe (of Mellow 94.7) who I got to first partner with on hosting. Chloe was also the one who got me into radio and started me up with hosting and I cannot say it enough that I owe this career to her. Being a seasoned announcer, Dj Chloe is very well rounded. She is quick, witty, articulate and knows how to pace a sequence. She can balance her co-hosts energy with hers if her partner is low (which was usually my case when I open a program), she knows how to keep the energy up when it’s dragging, funny when it calls for and never leaves her partner hanging. I say this because I’ve experienced other co-hosts who can’t keep it tight and does their own thing.

A good partner always lets a co-host and audience in on what he/she’s onto. A good co-host is also conscious enough not to be dragged into anything and neutralizes any excessive emotional behavior on stage. To have good chemistry, one has to feel out the situation whether to lead or downplay. Some hosts that I’ve seen (not partnered with) sky rockets the energy up and if the partner can’t keep up, they’ll just keep going without any regard. What’s even worst is, when your co-host would disagree (indirectly) with you especially during an adlib, or bashes / insults the partner live. These should be managed tastefully and discussed offline. To make it work, partners should talk about what and what not to say. Ride with each other’s flow when you go off-script.

I have also been on stage with someone less experienced than me. My take is when I tend to overpower my co-host, I throw comments or open questions that will give him/her an opening to get him/her back on track. If your partner is keen, they’ll pick up from that and get with the flow.

Not looking like a team on stage is something you dont want people to see. Since all eyes and ears are on you, people will immediately notice that something is up. And for someone like me who is observant (so I can learn), I’ll sniff that one out in an instant.

My last partner on radio DJ Jaybee was a fun part of my life. We’d always laugh and have fun on air. What I say, she agrees to and vice versa, whatever we didn’t agree on, we took it tastefully and transform it in a smart banter. We give each other room to speak our mind and if one needs to stall (especially when we need to load a song on deck) we knew how to catch each other and pickup where we left off. It takes time to get to know your partner and maximize your similarities or work around the differences.

Chemistry sometimes come naturally, some take time, and some never happen. It is not something you can force. You may learn or develop the chemistry and it’s always a give and take situation.

So what are your other hosting issues? Let’s talk about it.

2015/01/img_9911.jpg

2015/01/img_9912.jpg

2015/01/img_9909.jpg

From an audience perspective, one can speculate and answer this immediately. The fine qualities of a host or an emcee and how the audience perceive us is just the tip of the iceberg.

Have you ever seen what goes on behind the stage or runway of a fashion show? Chaos! This applies to even the most organized events. For smaller events, there are very few talents to coordinate, props to handle, stage coordination and direction but still a lot of things may be unexpected during a live event or show. All this is basically what hosts have to deal with sometimes.

Directors or organizers request that all talents be present during orientation so everyone’s aligned and aware of movements, queues, changes and everything else that will go on. As THE HOST, our role is to be on top of everything so the audience can be walked through the program audibly, visually with the whole experience. We’re expected to bring energy since we have initial contact with the audience. We have the responsibility to get their attention and maintain it the entire time. Entertainment is a bonus, and definitley stretching adlibs are the clincher.

Moxx the HostA great host is very fluid with sequences, mixing script and adlib with a dash of entertainment and A LOT of focus. Not everyone can wing it. It needs total awareness of the program, the premises, the pace and energy. You don’t just read off a script, you don’t just blabber what comes to mind. You also have to be tasteful and classy enough to throw a line that audience of different ages, race, nationality, religion and sex would be able to accept. Some events may have a specific target group which is easier but there are still some differences you have to consider. A great host also has to have that commanding presence, a confidence that will set him/her apart. A smile that is contageous and sincere goes a long way but you also have to have something more to give like smart or witty lines.

Movement is also a factor. Standing stiff and knowing where to put your hands also determine a confident host. If you’re the animated type of host, big movements are fine but this sometimes signify panic and tension. When your hands start expressing more than your words, it is distracting to an audience. Gliding comfortably around the stage when needed makes the audience’s visual dynamic. If you have a big stage, a great host might use it depending on the type of event he/she is doing. Managing a co-host on stage is a different story and will tackle this on my next blog.

A crowd as big as 1000 eyes are watching and a great host would be able to make the illusion that he/she is looking into each and every one of them. Connecting to everyone (verbally and emotionally) is a big responsibility but THAT is the main goal. In experience, a smaller crowd to address is more difficult because you have to manage your energy. The connection you make to a crowd of 20 needs a more powerful approach and you know within yourself that your main goal is to make a difference with everyone, and you would think it’s easy to attain?

Put yourself in our shoes for a moment…

A great host is confident but not arrogant. He/she should be comfortable and enjoys this job, otherwise you come off rather incencere.

After all this, a great host needs to conserve his energy still and manage not to lose his priced possesion for the job, the voice. After a good 3 hours (average), a host has spent their voice and energy. I have learned different remedies to make recovery faster and just like athletes, its science.

The Host or Emcee may not matter as much as their main acts of a show or event but you will notice the difference between the good, the great and the bad ones.

I wake up for this, looking forward to my next gig. Eagerly waiting to meet strangers that won’t remember me. Smiles that fade an hour after. I wear my best clothing that should’t outshine the celebrants or the main attraction. We are the first and last person you normally see see in these events.

What makes a great host? The one with heart.

For the best hosts and talents, check out our profiles at http://www.blacktiemanila.com Continue reading