As a professional, and I’m sure everyone would like to be regarded as one of high class, it is always common courtesy to return/answer a missed call or a text message regardless of its intent. 

You may not always want what’s in store for you on the other end of the line but you are skilled and classy enough to manage it. 

There would be times that we get so busy in life that we forget to respond to important messages. This is just one of the things going on with a professional’s daily grind. We would also be caught doing something important that we need to keep our gadgets and this delays responses to emails, calls and text messages. Most of the time, especially during work hours/days, this can be critical. There are also times these are just personal messages we did not intend to miss.

The reason behind returning a call or SMS, or better yet, answering them is simple: because it might be important. If you were on the other end of the trail, you would hate to be left hanging. You would definitely hate being ignored and this gives you more reason to be responsible in managing these whenever possible. 

How would you feel if in the biggest presentation of your life, your partner didn’t get to print hardcopies for your client, you call the office for backup but nobody answers. You call your partner and doesn’t pick up? Or the only way you can get a client’s answer is through email and you need their answer in the next two hours and get no response. A minute lasts like eternity, right? 

Whatever the reason may be, there is a need to pickup a call, SMS, email, etc or get back as soon as possible. If you are smart and classy enough, you will be able to handle even the worst situation and come out relieved. 

We are professionals, ones of high class. Let us always act like one.

This is another idea created for you soon-to-be wedded couples.

Truth is, there are a lot of people getting married. I know, I host most of them in a year. If you were in my position going to different weddings for different people, you’ll see the contrast between each and every one of it. It’s practically the same, I just make it different so that I also enjoy the event. It’s called a celebration anyway.

So here’s another tip for you love birds, something for your garter retrieval or maybe something to do to keep your guests entertained. Hard fact of the matter is, unless you give your participants incentive or a reason to play this game, they will not play so best if you prepare prizes, or if you use this as your garter retrieval game for the single men or as replacement of the bouquet toss for the women, you got yourself a fun game.

The game is called PROPS! as the title suggests. The participants are split into pairs (or may be done individually), each given a different unusual prop. The pairs alternate at the prompting of the host’s buzzer, giving short scenes using their prop in a unique way. The game typically results in a series rapid-fire one- or two-liners, especially in later playings. Another way to run this is to hand out one prop at a time and use for each contestant. The contestant who can’t think of anything in a snap is considered out. The winner or the last man/woman standing gets to choose among the rest of the non-winning players who will take the garter from the lovely single woman.

To get what I’m talking about…

For more wedding ideas, games and anything related to hosting, please feel to check out my blog and links on my blogsite: https://moxxthehost.wordpress.com

We have gone over a lot of wedding stuff, and if you’re preparing for your own, I’m sure you’ve heard and seen the parts of a program but do you really know what’s going on? Do you know the meaning of what you’re doing? I’m sure you’ll give me a 50% nod and still have no idea what it’s for.

Through this blog entry, I’ll try to explain some of the wedding programs’ symbolism (as cliché as it is) and give you some fresh ideas on what you can do to make it exciting or at least as memorable.

WC-Cutting-300x234One of the most common part of wedding receptions is the ceremonial cutting of the cake. The bride cuts the first piece together with the groom. It has come to symbolize the first task in the couple’s life together. Originally, the guests would take part of this to but as cakes became grander and guest lists get bigger, the task became quite unnerving. After cutting the cake, the bride and groom feed each other the first slice which symbolizes the mutual commitment to share and provide for each other. Two people as one facing life’s journey together. Wedding is a commitment to share whatever path life takes you on, with love and devotion, and the shared cutting of the first slice represents this commitment. Sharing of the cake to each other symbolizes your vows which means to love, honor and respect one another.

Lately, I have had requests from couples that I host to leave out the traditional symbolism spiels for the cake cutting and wine toast just because they find it senseless. I kind of agree that this spiel is just a waste of breath as no one intently listens to it and remembers so, I devised a way to spruce up this portion and make it more meaningful, to sum it up:

  • It is the first task in the couple’s life together
  • Commitment to each other
  • Sharing and providing for each other
  • Love and devotion
  • Sometimes, they even say that whomever eats the bigger slice in one bite rules the house.

So my suggestion here is to narrate to the crowd a simple mini-vow coming from the couple while they are doing the ceremonial cake cutting. A simple 1-minute testimonial for each other (bride and groom) telling each other how they plan to do this in their most simple, sincerest way. They may even get their cheesiest lines from their original vows (I would ask this from the couple but this means they would have to give me a copy of their vows which might be somewhat out of the way for them). This is good for the video and is cheesier (or generally saying, sweeter) way of pulling off the segment.

30University-Club-Chicago-Wedding-Sweetchic-Events-Second-Print-Productions.-Bride-and-Groom.-Wine-Toast.-Cheers.-680x453Next is the ceremonial toast. Again, it’s a tradition that almost all couples go through during a wedding reception unless they can get away with it. Basically, the wine represents two individual lives, and the intertwining arms while drinking it combines them into one single life. It also symbolizes passion and to some, fertility for each other coming into a married life.

It’s a day where we set aside whatever we find is corny and cheesy and overdone. It’s your day, you are licensed to be a cheese-ball and no one will care. So what we do instead is to tweak it to make it less traditional-ish. We do the same for the wine toast, another narrative of each other’s’ promise (such as in the vows) expression how they plan to keep each other passionately interested, how they see themselves in 50 years, what type of family scale do they wish, how do they envision their future to be, those things. It is to epitomize what they aspire to become as one unit.

I see these wedding reception segments from three point of views: the organizers’, the couples’ and the guests. To most, these are overused and traditionally pointless for our modernistic taste, but if we look deeper into its roots, the history of why we do this is very special yet then again, the basis is nothing but ritualistic. Every wedding that I go to whether I host or as a guest has their own take, their own style and treatment but at the end of the day, it all boils down to the two people (eventually as one) celebrating it. It doesn’t matter what the program is as long as it is done tastefully and in order, that’s the essence of preparing for the whole thing. The rest is just for documentation and memory.

Being a host, I always get my audience involved. I engage them with the program. They are the program and their opinions will build a bigger stage for me to play in. The better their participation, the smoother my program can run.

So here’s a little clincher that I need to get an outside perspective from.

I grow my facial hair for so many reasons…actually I only (really) have two:
1. People do not take me as seriously because they think I look young(er). This is flattering considering my real age but imagine the disadvantage when I’m in front of clients. If my eyes aren’t expressive enough and not bring much wisdom, then where do I stand? This also surprises some people and get them curious eventually asking me how old I am. when I tell them, imagine the “aha!” moment.

2. I simply have chubby cheeks. With my genetically gifted body (sense the sarcasm), one can only manage so much. When all the fats have gone, my face (the cheeks especially) will still be there. The facial hair distracts the people from looking directly at it noticing my chipmunk cheeks. I was fit 2 years ago and it lasted for about 8 months more and it sucks but what can a middle-aged man do?

I’m also quite torn. Whether performing, hosting, or speaking with clients, people say that it is “corporate” to be neat, same as some women say clean and neat is always good. Then there are some who find the scruffy look more appealing, that it adds character to a person. The term “fear the beard” is not only to put terror on other people but I believe this as a difference in presence. Then again, there are my parents and wife saying that the ‘stache gives my baby facial rashes, when I kiss them it’s “itchy” on the face. It looks cool on photos, makes me look manly and adds a little something extra for my overall look. These things make it hard to decide…Plus, I forgot that it is tremendously painful to shave every after 2 days. Women who shave armpits and crotches will know this, so do men with my same dilemma. It is also expensive on razors.

So here we are. I need to know and basically just want to hear your opinions and suggestions on which is better. Lately, the facial hair has gained back its popularity and I was one of the blessed ones to be able to grow it. It is just difficult to keep up. I am the type who feels that I need to do something different with my look after (maximum) of 2 months.

Is it better grown and groomed or clean and shaved?

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If I asked you, have you read so much in a few hours, you’d probably just laugh at me because I know a lot of you are bookworms. If I asked you though, have you read so much in a few hours…aloud…in public…in front of high achieving doctors and distiguished individuals, would you have the same reaction? 

I am proud for accomplishing such given the night of March 11, 2015. 

On the date I mentioned, I was referred by a highschool batchmate / friend, Donna to be the host of their self-organized event. Health & Lifestyle (or (H&L) is the only magazine for doctors, and this day recognized extraordinary individuals, groups and organizations that advocate a healthy lifestyle – The Exemplar Awards 2015. 



It was a night of celebrating and recognizing outstanding achievers in their fields and advocacy in bringing information and education to the public on a better lifestyle. It was an honor to have been a part of it. 

Words may not be enough to explain or honor these idividuals (group and organizations)  on the work they do to help other people and the industry but I did so in introducing them. I literaly did. Normally, I’d be asked to adlib or get spontaneous but that night was information-filled, a bit too much of what I could probably handle. I was responsible for a script filled with important names and terminologies (some of which I couldn’t even pronounce) that I had to perform (not just read out) so we don’t bore the audience to death. Being an announcer (before) and an experienced voice-over talent, I used everything I’ve got. I had to stress out items, sound off intonation for lines and read out things with modulated voice, and did I mention I had to perform this and not just read out? 



I’m used to speaking with long durations in a program but reading off of a script was a challenge. It requires mental focus a good, consistent pace in breathing and a lot more of both. A program, as I’ve mentioned in my other blog posts is chaotic, especially if it involves impromptu guests and changes in lineup of the program. These elements were also present and made it more challenging. Something that I’m also used to, but combining all those were a level up for me…ACHIEVEMENT UNLOCKED! I was at some point losing some of the pronounciations of names, terms and words but stammering and coming back to your mistakes will just make me look unprofessional. Most of the time, with a program like this, guests attention are not 100% so I left the event seemingly unscathed. There may be other people who could’ve pulled it off better but for me, it was an experience I can definitely learn from. I’m just glad my experience as a host helped my composure, my mental awareness and endurance to get through it. These things help me become better, experiencing these give me an edge to those who get it easy. 

At the end of the night, I was met with smiles, a lot of handshakes and “good job” congratulations. It feels good that it was still appreciated and had good feedback. I rated my own performance about 70% that night but the reactions and feedback made me rethink. Screw that, I prefer the smiles and handshakes. It feels good to be appreciated. It motivates me to be at my best all the time.



Congratulations again to the FAME team and thank you for having me. I hope to work with guys again.

If you have worked with me before, you might have heard me say that I have tried to avoid wedding gigs because I (used to) dread them. The intimacy and close-personal relationship of the guests to each other challenges me and basically, I thought I just didn’t want to ruin a family occasion. Ones that are recorded on video, ones that you bring along your memory until you grow old….”that’s the host that screwed up my wedding” type of thing.

Lately, I seem to have grown passed that and if you’ve also read my other blog entries, I’m beginning to enjoy it. It just dawned on me that I was actually the one creating the moments. I AM THE MASTER OF CEREMONIES (pardon the shameless plugging). Regardless of how a bride and a wedding planner envisions the event, it is up to me how to make it better…or worse. The timing, the lines I say, that mostly are spontaneous, create these moments, and I just thank the Big Guy up there for giving me this talent (if any) to do somethingnreally special formother people.

Yesterday, March 14 2015, I celebrated with the Pizzaro family. It was yet a hurdle I haven’t passed through in my life. It wasn’t the usual wedding, or a corporate party. They were celebrating a surprise party for Jessie Pizzaro on his 60th.

Remember when I said how I used to dread intimate occasions? This is a very good example. It was a very tight crowd of 30 guests consisting of family and close friends. With that much people, messing up a portion or sequence is highly noticeable. In a crowd of a thousand, I can create an illusion that I am staring at each one of them and engaging everyone. With a smaller crowd, I had to try to satisfy each one (or so I thought I should). I’m quite critical on myself and my performance. I have a certain level of quality that I expect from my profession especially with myself. If I had 1000 guests, I want to make sure they listen. All the more pressure to keep the attention of 30 guests, like in statistics, the smaller the quantity, the higher ratio of proportion is expected. I am quite used to adlibs but people are different from each other and like/dislike different things.

So as I was hoping, guests could arrive before the surprise so I can whip up a pretty good spiel. I was also praying that the guests were game enough to participate. Both were tough on me. Though part of me was really expecting that older people won’t really be as game, I just really wanted everyone to have fun. So I did my usual adlib punchlines, people laughed. When I asked them to say something special for Jessie, our celebrant, they did, and it was quite touching because Jessie was a crowd favorite. A Pieces if you are familar with the traits are very loyal. They pick the right people to be with and make them feel as comfortable as much as they can. They take emotions of their friends as their own and empathize soemtimes way too much. This was what I noticed evryone was telling him as they greeted him a happy birthday. When I finally got to warm up, I forgot all my worries. Everything went well.

Then we played some games.

Just like children’s games, I wanted them to enjoy each others’ company. The things you don’t usually do, these same things that you spend with friends and let you go out of your comfort zones are experiences never forgotten. I knew most of them are shy, even with incentives but the power of love and fun can change things and I hope I was able create this memorable moment with them. This I believe is what party should be all about…not the bass.

I have overcome 2 things that day. 1. I won’t doubt myself of screwing up a momentous occasion. I realized that as long as I stick with my objective of bringing memorable moments to my client friends, there’s nothing more special I can offer..and 2. Smaller crowds should not scare me anymore for the same reason as #1. I passed that hurdle lighthearted. I am lucky to be in the presence of a family that truly cares for someone and that I think was the highlight of my day.

To Jessie, a happy 60th and I wish you good health and wonderful company. To the Pizzaro family, thank you for the wonderful experience and for welcoming me to this occasion.

All productions have had booboos. If I haven’t repeatedly talked about the chaos in directing an event, well…there’s not much more I ccan say, it’s the reality of it. Speaking of booboos, I ran into mine last night. It’s nothing majorly embarassing but it’s definitely a story for the books.

In my years of hosting, I’m used to getting calls from random people at random times in the day (and wee hours), and sometimes with random requests. I would just qualify it normally with the price, length and the concept. Anything that violates my principles as a person and a professional, I would likely turn down.
So the story goes…

I was contacted by an event director who I’ve worked with before. She got me once as a host to my biggest crowd ever (1000 or more at Araneta Colesium) and have tested my hosting chops then, she’d also call me in sometimes for a voice-over job and most times I wouldn’t be able to do it to balance my day job with hosting which at the moment is still a weekend thing. Normally she’d ask me if I were free on the date to book me and gove me details later. Having to jug my weekday meetings and gig on the weekend, I totally forgot to ask the full details on her booking: when, where, what and how. So I shot a text asap and got the date, time and venue. After which I remembered to ask the attire. She said to come in business casual when I knew the venue was a big hotel. So I thought, maybe it’s a laid-back gig. So I assumed I’ll ne hosting guests at the hotel or something. Then I asked the titel of the show. It was for a major consumer children’s milk brand add guests were doctors, midwives and nurses. So I thought, what the heck…

IMG_0171The next day, I thought I’d dress up nice anyway since I had meetings that day. If I overdress, then I wouldn’t mind standing out because I will be on stage. So I suited up in the most casual way.
When I got called in at 3pm, I checked out the venue. It was big, it was cool and was not short of amazing. The director was busy with last minute rehearsals of the lights and sounds production so I patiently situated myself near the techbooth and waived to the team to let them know I’ve arrived. A few minutes after, one of the team approached me with a thick stack of stapled bond paper. I smiled back and read through it. It showed a lot of “AOB” and long speaking lines. While I tried to figure out which one my part was, I saw somewhere towards the half of the script saying “introduce host – Mr. Piolo Pascual”… And right on queue, someone handed me the mic…a wired one.

My brain hanged like pentium 4 on Windows 8. I wasn’t the host afterall.

So to cut the long story short, my lesson learned is to always ask questions when you are not sure. Never assume anything. As a professional Emcee, you have to be assertive. Even if you already are sure, it doesn’t hurt to reiterate.

For those who have experienced public speaking, have you ever shared the floor with a guest or a partner? This is nothing new to our world and you will always be asked to work with other people.

How do you know good or bad chemistry between co-hosts?

In my 4years as a professional host/emcee, I’ve had my share of the best, the worst, then there’ just the untrained. What I’ve realized is that not all people who can speak well are qualified to be a public speaker, moreover, they are not the best to co-host with.

Let me take you back a bit 4 years ago when I started on radio where I was trained by DJ Chloe (of Mellow 94.7) who I got to first partner with on hosting. Chloe was also the one who got me into radio and started me up with hosting and I cannot say it enough that I owe this career to her. Being a seasoned announcer, Dj Chloe is very well rounded. She is quick, witty, articulate and knows how to pace a sequence. She can balance her co-hosts energy with hers if her partner is low (which was usually my case when I open a program), she knows how to keep the energy up when it’s dragging, funny when it calls for and never leaves her partner hanging. I say this because I’ve experienced other co-hosts who can’t keep it tight and does their own thing.

A good partner always lets a co-host and audience in on what he/she’s onto. A good co-host is also conscious enough not to be dragged into anything and neutralizes any excessive emotional behavior on stage. To have good chemistry, one has to feel out the situation whether to lead or downplay. Some hosts that I’ve seen (not partnered with) sky rockets the energy up and if the partner can’t keep up, they’ll just keep going without any regard. What’s even worst is, when your co-host would disagree (indirectly) with you especially during an adlib, or bashes / insults the partner live. These should be managed tastefully and discussed offline. To make it work, partners should talk about what and what not to say. Ride with each other’s flow when you go off-script.

I have also been on stage with someone less experienced than me. My take is when I tend to overpower my co-host, I throw comments or open questions that will give him/her an opening to get him/her back on track. If your partner is keen, they’ll pick up from that and get with the flow.

Not looking like a team on stage is something you dont want people to see. Since all eyes and ears are on you, people will immediately notice that something is up. And for someone like me who is observant (so I can learn), I’ll sniff that one out in an instant.

My last partner on radio DJ Jaybee was a fun part of my life. We’d always laugh and have fun on air. What I say, she agrees to and vice versa, whatever we didn’t agree on, we took it tastefully and transform it in a smart banter. We give each other room to speak our mind and if one needs to stall (especially when we need to load a song on deck) we knew how to catch each other and pickup where we left off. It takes time to get to know your partner and maximize your similarities or work around the differences.

Chemistry sometimes come naturally, some take time, and some never happen. It is not something you can force. You may learn or develop the chemistry and it’s always a give and take situation.

So what are your other hosting issues? Let’s talk about it.

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From an audience perspective, one can speculate and answer this immediately. The fine qualities of a host or an emcee and how the audience perceive us is just the tip of the iceberg.

Have you ever seen what goes on behind the stage or runway of a fashion show? Chaos! This applies to even the most organized events. For smaller events, there are very few talents to coordinate, props to handle, stage coordination and direction but still a lot of things may be unexpected during a live event or show. All this is basically what hosts have to deal with sometimes.

Directors or organizers request that all talents be present during orientation so everyone’s aligned and aware of movements, queues, changes and everything else that will go on. As THE HOST, our role is to be on top of everything so the audience can be walked through the program audibly, visually with the whole experience. We’re expected to bring energy since we have initial contact with the audience. We have the responsibility to get their attention and maintain it the entire time. Entertainment is a bonus, and definitley stretching adlibs are the clincher.

Moxx the HostA great host is very fluid with sequences, mixing script and adlib with a dash of entertainment and A LOT of focus. Not everyone can wing it. It needs total awareness of the program, the premises, the pace and energy. You don’t just read off a script, you don’t just blabber what comes to mind. You also have to be tasteful and classy enough to throw a line that audience of different ages, race, nationality, religion and sex would be able to accept. Some events may have a specific target group which is easier but there are still some differences you have to consider. A great host also has to have that commanding presence, a confidence that will set him/her apart. A smile that is contageous and sincere goes a long way but you also have to have something more to give like smart or witty lines.

Movement is also a factor. Standing stiff and knowing where to put your hands also determine a confident host. If you’re the animated type of host, big movements are fine but this sometimes signify panic and tension. When your hands start expressing more than your words, it is distracting to an audience. Gliding comfortably around the stage when needed makes the audience’s visual dynamic. If you have a big stage, a great host might use it depending on the type of event he/she is doing. Managing a co-host on stage is a different story and will tackle this on my next blog.

A crowd as big as 1000 eyes are watching and a great host would be able to make the illusion that he/she is looking into each and every one of them. Connecting to everyone (verbally and emotionally) is a big responsibility but THAT is the main goal. In experience, a smaller crowd to address is more difficult because you have to manage your energy. The connection you make to a crowd of 20 needs a more powerful approach and you know within yourself that your main goal is to make a difference with everyone, and you would think it’s easy to attain?

Put yourself in our shoes for a moment…

A great host is confident but not arrogant. He/she should be comfortable and enjoys this job, otherwise you come off rather incencere.

After all this, a great host needs to conserve his energy still and manage not to lose his priced possesion for the job, the voice. After a good 3 hours (average), a host has spent their voice and energy. I have learned different remedies to make recovery faster and just like athletes, its science.

The Host or Emcee may not matter as much as their main acts of a show or event but you will notice the difference between the good, the great and the bad ones.

I wake up for this, looking forward to my next gig. Eagerly waiting to meet strangers that won’t remember me. Smiles that fade an hour after. I wear my best clothing that should’t outshine the celebrants or the main attraction. We are the first and last person you normally see see in these events.

What makes a great host? The one with heart.

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